Conversations from the Royal Welsh Show 2017

For the second consecutive year, Inspection Wales partners (Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales, Estyn, Wales Audit Office and Healthcare Inspectorate Wales) shared a stand at the Royal Welsh show, to engage with the public about our joint and shared working and, to gather the public’s views about the quality of rural services for a future Wales Audit Office report.

I attended on Monday, the first day of the show, and had a number of interesting conversations with members of the public about the work carried out by Inspection Wales partners. As you read this blog, please bear in mind that it represents my account of what I have been told. I have not fact checked what my interlocutors told me. Rather, I have sought to position the issues they raised within a wider context and show how they relate to the work of Inspection Wales partners.

One of my early conversations was with a man who talked to me about plans to regenerate the area of Merthyr town centre around the Pont-y-Cafnau bridge, which is known as the oldest iron bridge in the world [opens in new window]. For him, the end of European Union funding for Wales due to Brexit was a big concern, as it meant the end of a potential source of funding for such regeneration projects.

Brexit is clearly a challenge for the Welsh Government going forward. Under the current round of EU structural funding Wales will benefit from £2 billion of direct funding, and when match funded should, according to the Welsh Government, result in investment of over £3 billion [opens in new window]. The Public Policy Institute Wales finds that Wales has been a net beneficiary from EU structural funds [opens in new window] and that Wales receives substantially more EU funding per head than other UK countries.

In September 2016, the Wales Audit Office reported that the Welsh Government intended to bid for £125 million of EU funding [opens in new window] for elements of the South Wales Metro transport scheme [opens in new window], which has a total estimated cost of around £734 million. The June 2017 Economy, Infrastructure and Skills Committee report [opens in new window] on the rail franchise and South Wales Metre found that Brexit has raised a question mark about the proposed EU contribution, and that ‘while the UK government has provided assurances that it will honour any agreed EU funding commitments up to 2020, it is impossible to argue that this money is secure’.

The same man also talked about what he saw as the ‘wild claims’ being made about the potential economic impact of the proposed Circuit of Wales racetrack; perhaps his interest related to the proximity between his own home in Merthyr and the proposed location of the circuit in Ebbw Vale. I was able to provide him with a copy of the recent Wales Audit Office report on the Welsh Government’s decision to provide over £9.3 million to support initial development of the Circuit of Wales project [opens in new window].

On the same theme of Welsh Government investment in business, I talked to a number of people from north Wales about the April 2014 Wales Audit Office examination of the public funding and closure of the Cywain heritage, rural life and sculpture centre in Bala [opens in new window]. At the time of publishing, the centre and all its facilities were closed. However, I was told that a cafe is now operating at the site.

Wales Audit Office performance auditors undertook a survey about rural services at this year's Royal Welsh Show
Wales Audit Office performance auditors undertook a survey about rural services at this year’s Royal Welsh Show

I also had a number of conversations with people who told me they had used inspection reports by Estyn and Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales to decide which schools and care homes to use for family members. On a personal level, it felt good to talk to people who were actually using the work of Inspection Wales partners to help them make informed decisions about the futures of their families. I also spoke with people about their experiences of healthcare in Wales, and told them about the role Healthcare Inspectorate Wales plays in regulating and inspecting healthcare services in Wales.

Readers may be interested to note that, although Healthcare Inspectorate Wales does not routinely investigate individual complaints or concerns, it would still like to hear about concerns and it monitors all complaints it receives [opeans in new window]. It uses complaints information as a way of gaining a picture of the overall safety and quality of healthcare services.

About the author

Emma Giles, Inspection Wales Programme Board ManagerDr Emma Giles took over as Inspection Wales Programme Manager in March 2017. Prior to this, Emma was a performance audit lead with the Wales Audit Office.
Emma is an outdoor enthusiast who likes mountain biking and walking.

Her PhD in Criminology looked at how offenders and criminal justice staff understood fairness, and what these differing perceptions of fairness meant for relationships between staff and offenders.

Working together to deliver the joint review of governance arrangements at Betsi Cadwaladr UHB

The Wales Audit Office and Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW) completed their fourth joint review of governance at Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board on 29 June 2017.

Cover of the reportThey concluded that ‘while the direction of travel is positive, there is still much that needs to be done’. You can read the report on both the Wales Audit Office [opens in new window] website and on HIW’s website [opens in new window].

However, the purpose of this blog is not to focus on the conclusions reached. Rather, it is based on conversations I had with review team members. Its purpose is to reflect upon their experiences, and in so doing to highlight the benefits of collaboration and identify some factors which contributed  to successful joint working and some potential challenges. What follows might not be ‘rocket science’, but I hope you find this slightly different perspective on audit and inspection interesting.

Joint working added value in a number of ways, particularly communicating to the Health Board the seriousness of the challenges it faces

For the review team members, the very act of the Wales Audit Office and HIW coming together to undertake a joint review is important because it sends a strong message to the Health Board, its partners and stakeholders about the seriousness of the concerns about the governance arrangements at the Health Board.

The message is further strengthened as the 29 June 2017 review was the fourth in a series of joint pieces of work undertaken since 2012. Over that time, the joint HIW and Wales Audit Office reviews of Betsi Cadwaladr have established themselves as authoritative accounts of the progress made by the Health Board in meeting the challenges it faces.

The strength of the message and the authority of the report should increase the likelihood that the Health Board takes actions on the areas of remaining concern, which include that the Health Board has yet to develop a clear plan for how clinical services in North Wales should be reshaped to ensure that they are clinically and financially viable.

Drawing upon the relative skills and experiences of HIW and Wales Audit Office staff led to a more comprehensive and whole system perspective about how the Health Board’s processes are working from the experiences of the patient upwards. Broadly speaking, Wales Audit Office staff brought expertise and knowledge about financial matters and governance, and HIW staff brought knowledge about patient care and safety.

‘It sounds cheesy, but successful joint working starts with a willingness to work together and a recognition of the expertise and skills of others’

The absence of shared repository for storing information, which then required the information to be shared by email, was the only issue identified as a challenge.  So to what can the review team ascribe the success of the project? And what advice would they give to others embarking on such joint work? Certainly the success of this piece of joint work lies, to some extent, in the fact that this was the fourth joint piece of work, and so there was a well-established and well understood approach to working together.

One of the team members told me that, while it sounds like a cliché, those embarking on joint working need to begin the journey with a willingness to work with others and a recognition of the skills and expertise which colleagues in other organisations can bring. Also, success was deemed to be about keeping the overall goal in mind, rather than becoming dogmatic about process. At the same time it was important to ensure that project management arrangements were clearly set out and the project was rigorously managed to complete it within agreed timelines.  Clear and frequent communication also seemed a key ingredient to the success of the project. Key elements of the process were jointly delivered, such as fieldwork and reporting to the Betsi Cadwaladr board. This links into an earlier comment about how joint working has helped to communicate to the Health Board the seriousness of the challenges it faces.

Finally, both project leads referred to a future piece of joint working, not between the Wales Audit Office and HIW, but between HIW and the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW) on community mental health teams. So watch out for that joint report which is due to be published early in 2018, and for another similar blog on the experiences of the HIW and CSSIW joint review team.

About the author

Emma Giles, Inspection Wales Programme Board ManagerDr Emma Giles took over as Inspection Wales Programme Manager in March 2017. Prior to this, Emma was a performance audit lead with the Wales Audit Office.
Emma is an outdoor enthusiast who likes mountain biking and walking.

Her PhD in Criminology looked at how offenders and criminal justice staff understood fairness, and what these differing perceptions of fairness meant for relationships between staff and offenders.

A teacher in a school

Inspection Wales Programme makes good progress

It’s sometimes said that external reviewers are like buses; they all turn up at the same time. And the challenge to the Inspection Wales partners, as the four principal external review bodies in Wales, is to demonstrably work together effectively to plan and deliver our work.  Such collaboration is essential to make the most of our respective, limited, resources, and to add most value to public bodies being reviewed and the people of Wales.

Front cover of the stocktake paperWe’ve now published a review of the progress [opens in new window] we’ve made in delivering our programme, an initiative to improve cooperation and collaboration between the four external review bodies in Wales.

The examples and case studies described within the paper demonstrate the extent to which the four review bodies are already planning and delivering work jointly, and show how, to again paraphrase another commonly used phrase, four heads are better than one.

The paper identifies long standing arrangements for collaboration, such as healthcare summits and quarterly meetings between the Heads of Inspection. It also outlines a recent new initiative from Estyn [opens in new window] and refinements to existing practices by CSSIW [opens in new window] which further demonstrate the commitment to information sharing by Inspection Wales partners. It provides details of joint working, particularly, but not exclusively, in the areas of education and health. For example, joint reviews by Estyn and the Wales Audit Office [opens in new window] of the four regional consortia for education improvement and joint reviews by HIW [opens in new window] and CSSIW of learning disabilities and Deprivation of Liberty safeguards.

Next steps for Inspection Wales

Over the next 18 months, Inspection Wales will further progress its first joint national thematic review on the topic of services for young people. Working across their respective remits in this way will enable Inspection Wales partners to take a more comprehensive look at the services provided to young people by different public bodies and report more holistically on young people’s experiences of services.

There will be a further blog in the near future about the joint work Inspection Wales partners are doing on youth services in Wales. There will also be a further blog about the forthcoming joint HIW and Wales Audit Office review of governance at Betsi Cadwalder University Health Board.

Inspection Wales partners will also continue to engage with the Welsh Government as it develops its plans for local government reform, as set out in the January 2017 White Paper on local government reform.

About the author

Emma Giles, Inspection Wales Programme Board ManagerDr Emma Giles took over as Inspection Wales Programme Manager in March 2017. Prior to this, Emma was a performance audit lead with the Wales Audit Office.
Emma is an outdoor enthusiast who likes mountain biking and walking.

Her PhD in Criminology looked at how offenders and criminal justice staff understood fairness, and what these differing perceptions of fairness meant for relationships between staff and offenders.

 

 

Collaboration in Action – Working Together on Health Governance

We talk about collaboration a lot on this blog, and that’s because it important to make sure our partners work adds value to public services. It would be a waste of resources if we all looked at the same things in the same way. It’s important for other reasons too, if we looked at services through the same lens we might miss important issues.

Talking about it is one thing, but we thought it would be nice to show you how collaboration actually works for health services in Wales. Two of our partners both have roles in the external review of health service governance. Now you might think governance is somewhat dry subject for a blog, I would beg to differ!

Governance in it true sense is an enabler for effective organisations, it determines the big, important questions, like how do we do things around here? Is it acceptable to do this? How is an organisation structured? How do the leaders know if we are doing the right things? In health- are our patients safe?

wao_hiw_infographic_english

Healthcare Inspectorate Wales and the Auditor General for Wales both have specific remits which include governance of health services in Wales. Our partners could both just go out and review governance independently of each other, and report through their channels. But they decided that working collaboratively was better [opens in new window]. The paper [opens in new window]accompanying this blog explains how they do this in a clear way, but my summary is that we made a strategic decision to come at governance from two directions.

HIW approaches it from frontline services in individual wards and service areas, whereas WAO approaches it from the organisational top-down perspective. This means that our work complements each other. That is not enough on its own to get maximum value from our work, so we also work collaboratively in many ways, we use various formal and informal liaison mechanisms to make sure we make connections from what our work is telling us, and are able to spot many problems and draw attention to them before something awful happens.

We do this through our Healthcare Summit process, regular meetings between senior and operational staff from both partners, and engagement with Welsh Government through the NHS Escalation and Intervention process [opens in new window].

So what?

We have evolved our collaborative working since devolution, this is not something new, and this has helped us to produce a number of joint pieces of work from CAMS, to the Betsi Joint review of governance in 2013.

This is a good example of collaboration in action, and I hope you will read our partners paper.

A female carer helping a lady make cupcake cakes

Choice and voice: a joint approach

The collaborative approach to a joint inspection between Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW) and Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW) led to a successful report launch involving service users and carers, and a big push on social media on launch day.

Publishing our findings in June, we – the two inspectorates – challenged local authorities and health boards to improve the planning and delivery of services for people with learning disabilities.

Together we delivered a lengthy national inspection programme in six local authorities and local health boards, to see how services were planned and delivered for people in those areas.

We met with advocacy and involvement groups, including All Wales People First [opens in new window] and the All Wales Forum of Parents and Carers [opens in new window], and we produced an all-Wales report, which we launched at an event at iSmooth [open in new window], a Mencap Cymru [opens in new window] social enterprise in Ammanford.

This was thoroughly appropriate for this particular report, and gave the report more meaning than if it was a generic conference venue.

Many members of staff at iSmooth have learning disabilities and it was important that the venue was relevant to the types of issues discussed in the report, about the support available for people with learning disabilities.

Kevin Barker, inspector and CSSIW lead on the inspection said the process demonstrated a commitment to do what we expect others to do: work together to achieve a better result.

“Actions will always speak louder than words,” he said.

Online reaction

Words spoke loudly on the day of the report launch, with tweets between 28-29 June on the English-language @CSSIW Twitter channel [opens in new window] reaching more than 8,000 people.

Of those people who saw the tweets, 2.2% of them either clicked on them, clicked on links in them or expanded the images.

The most popular tweet from the launch which was seen by more than 2,240 people was the video of Wayne Crocker, Director at Mencap Cymru. It was retweeted 7 times and had 7 likes, by partners such as Mencap Cymru.

Meanwhile, tweets on CSSIW’s Welsh-language @Arolygu_gofal Twitter channel [opens in new window] reached 2,000 people over the two days. Of those people the tweets reached , 0.8% of them either clicked on the them or clicked on the link.

For the @HIW_Wales Twitter channel [opens in new window], which retweeted CSSIW’s tweets across the two days, their tweets reached 283 people, of which on average 0.4% of them engaged with them.

Valuable learning experience

Working together on such an important inspection programme has been a valuable learning experience for both organisations, commented Alun Jones, director of inspection, regulation and investigation for HIW [opens in new window].

“The resulting national inspection report and the individual local authority/health board reports are richer and more powerful for having input from both inspectorates,” he said.

“Our work has allowed us to shine a light on the way in which organisations work together to plan and deliver learning disability services.

“We have made a number of important recommendations which call for more effective joint working for the benefit of people with learning disabilities and their carers.”

Digging deeper

Richer more powerful reports were made possible by digging deeper with our inspection approach, explained HIW review manager, Emma Philander.

“From my point of view I feel that the highest quality care and support for adults with learning disabilities ensures that it meets the holistic needs of the person,” she said.

“By HIW and CSSIW working jointly it meant that we could better assess whether services were meeting people’s holistic needs, both from a health and social care perspective.

“Working together meant we could unpick the complexities of how health staff and social care staff were working together and the impact this had on people with learning disabilities.

“It meant we could dig deeper with our inspection approach and hold both the local authority and health boards to account to improve services for people with learning disabilities.

“I feel that both organisations learned from each other’s approaches and we look forward to building on this and collaborating more in the future.”

Policy and legislation manager for HIW, Nia Roberts, agreed.

“One of the other good things about this work was that we looked at health boards and local authorities at different levels,” she explained.

“We saw how colleagues from health and social services worked together on the front line to provide care and support to individuals with learning disabilities.

“We also asked senior representatives from health boards and local authorities to explain how they plan and commission to meet the needs of all people with a learning disability in their area. This involved scrutiny by both CSSIW and HIW.

“Given the provisions of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act, this was important work, which was enriched by having both inspectorates involved.”

CSSIW project lead Kevin Barker concurred.

“There were many benefits from the joint work between CSSIW and HIW in this inspection, not least the range and quality of the evidence that it delivered,” he said.

“People with learning disabilities and their family carers often need help and support from both health and social services. They expect a joined up approach from the people and agencies involved and so do the inspectorates.”

You can read the joint inspection report on the CSSIW website [opens in new window].

Putting the public into public services

Inspection Wales Programme Manager, Mandy Townsend visited the Royal Welsh Show last month as part of a joint Inspection Wales stand with the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW), Estyn, Health Inspectorate Wales and the Wales Audit Office. In this blog Mandy shares her thoughts on why the show represents a great opportunity to connect with the public we serve.

Since we started Inspection Wales we have talked a lot about our need to collaborate with each other. From joint reports on topics such as education and health, to our collaborative approach to whistleblowing, we can demonstrate the benefits we gain from joint working.

One of the key components to this is the public. As public service watchdogs we are working for the people of Wales to ensure that our Welsh public services are providing them to the best possible standards. So we need to hear from the public on not only how these services can be improved, but also the role they expect us to play in making this happen.

That’s why we all visited the Royal Welsh show last month. Having a presence at this huge event put us in contact with people from all over Wales, of all ages and all of whom get different things from different services.  Exhibiting at our Inspection Wales stand, we spoke to hundreds of people over the four days of the show. They all had interesting things to say to us about service improvement, and it was also a chance for those who perhaps hadn’t heard of us to raise some awareness about our work.

Exhibiting together as Inspection Wales went down well with visitors and reduced costs.
It also strengthened the relationships between the four organisations that make up Inspection Wales. Add to this the addition of some great insight from the Welsh public and I can honestly say the week was a real success.

In the video that accompanies this blog I have borrowed the phrase of the summer from our national football team (you know the one), to sum up the lessons learned from the week and these are applicable not only to that week but Wales as a whole. Despite being considered as a smaller nation we have proved that we are capable of great things. People often say that Wales is a connected nation and we can make it even more so by increasing our collaboration not only from public service to public service but also making that connection with the people we serve in order to complete the circle.

We won’t wait another year until the next show; we will continue our conversations and all get involved in improving services. So the next time you see a consultation from CSSIW, Estyn, Health Inspectorate Wales or the Wales Audit Office please get involved and share your thoughts and opinions. After all like Chris Coleman and his team, we really are ‘Together Stronger’.

About the author

Mandy TownsendMandy Townsend started work as the Inspection Wales Programme Manager in February 2015 and is seconded to the part-time role for two years.

Mandy, who is based in North Wales, spends the rest of her week in her original role as a Health Performance Auditor at the Wales Audit Office.

People walking past marquee's at the Royal Welsh Show

Find out more about Inspection Wales at the Royal Welsh Show

Livestock, farming and forestry aren’t usually part of the work of the Inspection Wales programme. But we’re excited to announce that Inspection Wales will be out in force at this year’s Royal Welsh Show [opens in new window] in Builth Wells, 18-21 July.

Exhibiting together for the first time since the show’s inception, inspectors and corporate staff from Healthcare Inspectorate Wales [opens in new window] (HIW), Estyn [opens in new window], Wales Audit Office [opens in new window] and Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales [opens in new window] (CSSIW) will be talking to visitors about the work they do both individually and together to help public services in Wales improve.

Together, we’ll be asking people how much they know about our work and gathering feedback to help inform our future communication. There’ll also be lots to see and do on our stand. We’ll be showcasing some of our joint working through case studies, displaying our latest projects and there’ll even be a small area for children.

The Estyn team are looking forward to meeting parents, teachers and learners who may be interested to hear about the way inspections of schools and other education and training providers are changing from September 2017.

Healthcare Inspectorate Wales are attending the show for the first time this year and will be raising awareness of the work within the inspectorate and seeking views on people’s experiences of healthcare services. They launched their new website last month and the team are looking forward to meeting visitors and asking for their views.

At the CSSIW stand, people will be invited to meet with inspectors and find out how to get involved in the inspectorate’s work.  Visitors can also learn more about inspection, registration, enforcement and seek advice on choosing care services.

The Wales Audit Office are returning for their second year and looking forward to having conversations with the public about the valuable role they play in holding public services to account and supporting improvement.

So, whether you’re visiting the show with family, friends or colleagues, come and meet the friendly staff at the Inspection Wales stand and learn more about our work.

Aerial view of the Senedd building

Our work helps you make informed decisions

Briefing for new Assembly Members

One of the things those of who work in the world of external review frequently get asked is, ‘what do you do?’. We know what we do is important, makes a difference, and the evidence we provide helps change things for the better, but perhaps a short briefing paper would help those of us not quite so immersed in our world understand? We thought so.

This is particularly important for the new Assembly, with the elections held on 5 May, as many of the Assembly Members will be new, and may not be familiar with our work. And they will be making decisions about public services right from the start of their new roles. Solid evidence helps people make good decisions.

Hence we prepared a short briefing paper, Audit, Inspection and Regulation in Wales [PDF 216KB opens in new window]. It provides a summary of who we are and what we do.

We hope it will be helpful, and encourage people to use our work to inform themselves. After all, you need to know we exist and the types of reports we write before you make decisions on services.

Our Inspection Wales partners work will help you answer questions like:

  • Is my council, or hospital well run?
  • Are schools in Wales getting better?
  • How did that happen? E.g. Cardiff Airport, Welsh Drainage Board
  • What do they spend all that money on?
  • What are the big problems we face in Wales?
  • And detailed information on specific topics such as: Are Welsh Operating Theatres getting better?
  • Are services helping older people stay independent?

So, our various reports add to the sum total of knowledge against which you can make your own decisions about individual schools, care homes and wider public services.

This briefing paper sets the background to our work, and points to further resources. We hope everyone who reads it will find it helpful.

Silver whistle

Inspection Wales partners’ role in whistleblowing in Wales

Who should I blow the whistle to if I work in Wales?

One of the objectives of the Inspection Wales Programme is working together efficiently. A key way is to ‘share and learn’ about our internal approaches to a number of things we all do.

One example of this is whistleblowing: three of our four partners are ‘prescribed persons’ under the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA ) [opens in new window], and all of us have people, whether employees of Welsh public bodies or members of the public, bringing us concerns. If the concerns are from members of workers, then they may (depending on what the concerns are) be classed as whistleblowing.

Whistleblowing is when a worker reports serious concerns about wrongdoing or malpractice in the workplace to someone.

All partners have mechanisms for dealing with concerns, and you can find them on our websites. But we realise it is not always easy to find who a potential whistleblower should contact in Wales. Hence our subtitle: who should I blow the whistle to if I work in Wales?

To help, we have prepared a short, simple guide to our respective responsibilities [opens in new window].

In a nutshell, if you have a concern about the NHS, Social Care, Education or value for money, fraud and corruption in relation to the provision of public services in Wales, this leaflet will help you decide which of our partners you should approach, and what you can expect to happen.

You can contact us even if you are not a worker and we will treat any such concerns seriously, but the specific protections under PIDA will not apply.

We cannot guarantee that we will keep your concern confidential or that we will investigate all concerns raised with us in detail, but we do take all approaches seriously and feed them into our collective intelligence to help us guide our work.

We hope this leaflet is helpful, and we intend it to supplement wider and more in-depth guidance on partners. More advice on our partners’ approaches:

There are also a number of external sources of advice, including the charity Public Concern at Work [Opens in new window].

Inspection Wales progress report cover on a white desk

Is joint working working? Collaboration between audit and inspection bodies in Wales … the story so far.

Four years ago, the heads of the 4 main audit and inspection bodies in Wales signed an agreement to formalise joint working between the bodies.

It was a logical move by the Wales Audit Office (led by the Auditor General for Wales), the Care and Social Services Inspectorate Wales (CSSIW), Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector for Education and Training in Wales (Estyn) and Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW).

The agreement strengthened links between the 4 organisations and provided a solid foundation for better collaboration, knowledge sharing and business planning. The key objective? To improve outcomes for the people of Wales.

But have we achieved what we set out to achieve?

Well, when I took up my new role as Inspection Wales Programme Manager in February 2015, it was the first thing I wanted to find out.

So have we?

Yes, I believe we have. But, (until now) we haven’t told many people about it.

We’ve produced a report on our progress so far, which provides some detailed findings if you’re interested in reading more. But, I will summarise here.

Relationships

They’re hard to measure, but I can testify that relationships between our four organisations are strong and exist at many levels across the businesses. There needs to be a level of trust to work together outside organisational comfort zones, and we do have this. I’m not saying that everything is perfect, and in some areas these relationships are still developing, but we have strong foundations in place.

Building blocks

We needed to agree how we do things together. That was not as easy as it could be because we all work to different laws and reporting arrangements. We’ve already published our remit paper, which explains all this in detail. Hence, we needed to work through basic processes like sharing information, and how we handle serious concerns about an organisation.

Joint working

We have done a lot of things together, but, we haven’t always told everyone that we did it together! Our stocktake report contains many examples, and some of these will be familiar pieces of work to you, but you might not have known they were joint.

We know we need to get better at sharing and our joint working achievements. That’s partly why we’ve set up this blog site. I’ll be writing more posts in the coming weeks and months, but you will also find posts from other people who are equally passionate about working together.

We look forward to sharing more with you about our audit and inspection missions to let the people in Wales know whether they are getting what they need and deserve.

About the author

Mandy Townsend on holiday sat in a boat

Mandy Townsend started work as the Inspection Wales Programme Manager in February 2015 and is seconded to the part-time role for two years.

Mandy, who is based in North Wales, spends the rest of her week in her original role as a Health Performance Auditor at the Wales Audit Office.